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HomeKNECKNEC Explains What Next For KPSEA and Grade 6 CBC students 

KNEC Explains What Next For KPSEA and Grade 6 CBC students 

KNEC Explains What Next For KPSEA and Grade 6 CBC students.

The directive not to employ Grade 6 assessment as a foundation for placement in junior high school altered KPSEA’s function in the curriculum.

The exams council decided to adopt KPSEA as a basis for gauging curriculum growth in response to the new guideline.

This means that all stakeholders in education will be involved in evaluating the Competency-Based Curriculum for holes to be patched.

David Njengere, the chief executive officer of Knec, stated that the council will advise relevant parties of necessary CBC modifications.

This is a result of President William Ruto’s directive that the assessment not be used to place Grade 6 students in junior secondary school.

“We will get back to KICD and tell them areas that need to be adjusted in the curriculum designs, and we will do the same with TSC,” Njengere said.

Njengere stated that TSC results will assist in identifying areas where teachers have struggled to deliver.

Even with the continued professional development of instructors, TSC will be able to make necessary adjustments in specific areas.

“We will inform TSC of specific areas where teachers are struggling to deliver in the curriculum,” he said.

For instance, if the statistics indicate that the majority of students struggled to comprehend cookery, TSC will need to incorporate it into their training.

According to the article, KPSEA would be used to monitor learning progress.

The study states, “It will be used as an assessment to monitor learning progress and provide feedback to education sector players on areas that require intervention.”

The move to employ KPSEA to place learners in JSS was a policy by the former regime which would domicile the learners in secondary.

With the new direction, students will reside in primary schools.

The function of the Ministry of Education will revolve around equity, access to education, and the operation of CBC as a whole.

“The same will also be given to the ministry, quality assurance they can now check how teachers are implementing the curriculum based on the assessment,” Njengere said.

12 subjects were merged to produce five assessments for sixth graders.

Integrated Science encompasses Science and Technology, Agriculture, Home Science and Physical Health.

Creative Arts and Social Studies encompass Social studies, Christian, Islamic and Hindu education, arts & crafts and music.

The summative assessments contribute 60%, while the school-based assessments each contribute 20%.

In contrast to the KCPE exams, in which candidates are graded on a scale of 100 percent, the KPSEA will only account for 40 percent of the final score.

The remaining sixty percent will be determined through classroom-based continuous assessment examinations administered in Grades 4, 5, and 6.

David Njengere disclosed plans to use the Grade 6 national examination to inform modifications to CBC.

This is a result of President William Ruto’s directive that the assessment not be used to place Grade 6 students in junior secondary school.

Njengere stated that TSC results will assist in identifying areas where teachers have struggled to deliver.

Even with the continual professional growth of teachers, TSC will be able to exert influence over specific areas requiring correction.

For instance, if the statistics indicate that the majority of students struggled to comprehend cookery, TSC will need to incorporate it into their training.

According to the article, KPSEA would be used to monitor learning progress.

The Ministry of Education will focus on equity, access to education, and the general operation of CBC.

KNEC Explains What Next For KPSEA and Grade 6 CBC students.

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