Tuesday, January 31, 2023
No menu items!
HomeEXAMINATIONSExam Cheating Is Unacceptable; Let Candidates Harvest What They Have Sown.

Exam Cheating Is Unacceptable; Let Candidates Harvest What They Have Sown.

Exam Cheating Is Unacceptable; Let Candidates Harvest What They Have Sown.

Exam cheating is a big problem here in Kenya, but it’s also a problem worldwide. It is dishonest to say that a candidate has an unfair advantage during an exam.

This bad habit hurts education, relationships, and mental health. Even though the ministry of education has done everything it can to stop cheating, students, teachers, government officials, exam boards, and parents are still getting caught.

Some students and even some schools want good grades at any cost, even if that means bribing supervisors at exam centers so they can bring in materials that aren’t allowed.

There are many cheating ways, like getting your test papers early or copying someone else’s work.

Cheating is a problem for high school, college, and university students, and cell phones are the most popular tool used by cheaters.


Cheating on an exam goes against the idea of fairness. It goes against the morals and attitudes that young people learn in school.

Worse, it shows that we can’t give all students the same chances to learn. It goes without saying that cheating makes tests less reliable.

The country is getting ready for three extensive tests that will affect the lives of millions of students.

These are the Grade Six test, the Kenya Certificate of Primary Education (KCPE), and the Kenya Certificate of Secondary Education (KCSE).

There will be more than 3.5 million people taking the tests.

The exams must be run in a way that shows the candidates’ true strengths and weaknesses for the next steps in their lives.

Exam cheating is an issue that frequently surfaces at this time. The administration has issued a warning that such behavior would not be allowed.

Currently, the most significant obstacle is the efficient administration of exams nationwide.

The candidates must understand that there are no shortcuts to success in life. They must labor diligently and harvest what they have sown.

Cheating on an exam is like living a lie that doesn’t pay off in the long run because people who get caught must deal with severe consequences.

The best interests of children should be a top priority for society. Letting people cheat on exams goes against this goal.

It is the equivalent of playing Russian roulette with their lives. Corruption predates the Bible.

Esau gave up his birthright for a meal of beans, Judas Iscariot betrayed Jesus for thirty pieces of silver, and Samson told Delilah the secret to his strength because he liked her.

Our national examinations have been subject to cheating and leaks.

The Education Ministry is said to stop these, primarily by making using cell phones at exam centers illegal and changing when papers are given out.

Suspects have been apprehended for impersonating candidates and disseminating counterfeit or authentic documents.

Some dishonest candidates attribute their behavior to the pressure placed on them by their relatives to pass the tests as the only way out of poverty.

Not too long ago, Kenyans were looked down upon because they helped undergraduate students worldwide plagiarize their theses. An apple falls near a tree.

Exam cheating is a serious issue that has previously hit our doorsteps.

Humanity is obligated to defend itself, particularly in these difficult times.

We can prevent children from wandering from their cribs to their academic graves.

Cheating on exams will put our delinquent children on the wrong side of the law.

According to data from 2019, 1.2% of the 53,304 inmate population consisted of youngsters.

However, children do not deserve to have their youth stolen by incarceration.

Per the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and the child’s best interests, priority should be given to counseling and molding such children (UNCRC).

This means evaluating and weighing “all the things you need to know to make a decision about a specific child or group of children in a specific situation.”

First, the child’s care, protection, and safety; second, the child’s rights and needs in terms of health and education are particularly pertinent.

Anti-cheating public awareness initiatives should be aggressively implemented in schools.

In 2018, Algeria and Iraq cut off their schools’ internet connections to stop students from cheating on exams.

From a human rights point of view, cutting off digital communication often hurts marginalized and vulnerable groups more than others, hurts the local economy, and causes a chain reaction of instability.

From November 28 to December 23, there will be tests.

According to the Kenya National Examinations Council schedule, the KCPE exam will be given from November 23 to 30.

January 23 is when the results should be known.

As the first test under the new Competency-Based Curriculum, the Grade 6 test is hard (CBC).

But people in charge of education and teachers must ensure no child is left behind.

This is the first time the Kenya Kwanza Alliance has been in charge of national tests.

The new government needs to keep up the fight against cheating on exams that the old government started.

When Dr. Fred Matiang’i and Prof. George Magoha were in charge of education, a campaign to stop cheating on exams was started and won.

CS Ezekiel Machogu, who took over for Prof. Magoha recently, should keep the same attitude.

He has told people in charge of education to keep an eye out for problems and not let their guard down.

Exams must be taken seriously so that candidates get what they deserve and can move on to the next level of training.

The honesty of exams also proves that academic certificates are genuine and that the people who get them are qualified to do their jobs.

Stopping exam cheating will teach kids to be honest by showing them that taking shortcuts is wrong and how important hard work and fair rewards are.

CS Machogu and his team must increase their surveillance to protect the integrity of exams.

According to the Algerian ministry of Education, the internet would be restricted for two hours each morning during baccalaureate exams.

This happened after papers from required high school tests were leaked and widely shared on social media.

Mobile phone jammers, metal detectors, and security cameras have been set up in 2,000 test centers.

Candidates shouldn’t fall for unscrupulous people who try to get them to cheat on exams. All they need to do is review what they’ve been learning since the papers are set based on the approved curriculum the teachers cover.

It’s important for a candidate to keep a positive attitude about life in general and exams in particular.

One’s confidence can be boosted by going into the exam room with a positive attitude. And one must be ready for what will happen.

This is the time to get help with questions or topics that seem hard to them. A well-prepared candidate gets the results they deserve, while those who try to cheat often see their results canceled.

Lastly, a candidate must not agree to cheat on an exam, or their results could be thrown out.

Let them do their best and feel good about themselves when they leave the room. Cheating costs a lot.

As Kenyans, we may acknowledge that instances such as exam cheating reflect our society through introspection.

We wish the applicants the best of luck as they demonstrate their acquired knowledge and prepare for the next phase of their lives.

Exam Cheating Is Unacceptable; Let Candidates Harvest What They Have Sown.

RELATED ARTICLES

Most Popular

WE'RE SOCIAL

16,167FansLike
1,786FollowersFollow
13,681FollowersFollow
1,296FollowersFollow
3,919FollowersFollow
61,453SubscribersSubscribe